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Article
July 19, 1958

CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PROTEIN AND GLYCOPROTEIN LEVELS IN CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

From the departments of neurology and biochemistry, Georgetown University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1958;167(12):1494-1495. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.72990290012009d
Abstract

Apostol and associates1 reported that the glycoprotein concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was frequently increased in neurological diseases; the level was especially high in patients with brain tumors. It was shown by Roboz and co-workers2 that the serum glycoprotein content is also increased in cases of central nervous system neoplasms. Other workers have indicated that diabetes,3 myocardial infarction,4 and rheumatic diseases5 may be associated with an increase in the serum carbohydrates which are bound to protein. In addition, this serum change has been observed in patients with congestive heart failure.6 It seemed pertinent to determine if the glycoprotein content of the cerebrospinal fluid, as well as of the serum, was increased in a common systemic disease, such as congestive heart failure. Such information would be of importance in assessing the specificity of elevations of the CSF glycoprotein level for lesions of the nervous

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