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Article
January 17, 1959

CHORIOCARCINOMAREPORT OF A CASE OF 25-YEAR SURVIVAL AFTER ORCHIECTOMY

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich.

From the Department of Surgery, Section of Urology, University of Michigan School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1959;169(3):253-254. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73000200001011
Abstract

Choriocarcinoma (chorion epithelioma) is the most malignant tumor of the testis. It arises from teratoma or from cells capable of giving rise to teratoma. The presence of more mature teratoid differentiation in tumors containing choriocarcinoma is associated with reduction in malignancy displayed by the latter.1 For certain definite periods, even the choriocarcinoma remains localized to the testis. Lewis2 reported that 80% of patients with choriocarcinoma had metastases present at the time of admission to the hospital. In one-half of them the metastases caused the presenting symptoms. Of the 38 patients with choriocarcinoma reported by Lewis in 1949, one was alive six years after radical orchiectomy and prophylactic radiation therapy. This patient had no demonstrable metastases preoperatively, and teratoid tissue was found with the chorionic element. On reviewing the English literature we were unable to find a follow-up report on a patient with choriocarcinoma surviving as long as 25

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