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Article
May 23, 1959

PULMONARY INFARCTION AFTER DENTAL EXTRACTIONREPORT OF TWO CASES WITH RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

Nashville, Tenn.

From the Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1959;170(4):412-416. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.03010040008002
Abstract

Two case-histories involving men aged 40 and 38 years illustrate the occurrence of pulmonary disease after extraction of teeth. In the first case the pulmonary symptoms commenced seven days after the extraction, with a sudden rise of temperature to 40 C on the 10th day marking the development of a pulmonary infarct. In the second case the pulmonary symptoms commenced five days after the extraction, and the subsequent course was marked by two episodes of severe chest pain indicating the development of pulmonary infarcts. Although the connection of the pulmonary symptoms with the dental procedures was not obvious at first, it became clear later that both patients had cervical phlebothrombosis which led to the pulmonary complications. It is concluded that in all cases of unexplained pulmonary infarction the patient's dental history should be considered.

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