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Article
October 17, 1959

SILVER IMPLANT IN SITU FIFTY-ONE YEARS AFTER RESECTION OF MANDIBLE

Author Affiliations

Santa Monica, Calif.

Professor of Oral Surgery, University of Southern California School of Dentistry, and Clinical Professor of Surgery (Oral), University of Southern California School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1959;171(7):890. doi:10.1001/jama.1959.73010250006006b
Abstract

A 61-year-old housewife was referred on March 26, 1958, to my office because a roentgenogram taken by her dentist showed an angular fracture of her left metal mandible. She had no complaints. Her history revealed that at 11 years of age she developed an extraoral protuberance. Her family doctor incised the protuberance, which yielded black blood. The wound healed and she was referred to Dr. John B. Murphy in Chicago. In March, 1908, Dr. Murphy removed1 her left mandible and inserted a metal jaw. The reason for the resection was that "a giant cell sarcoma had attacked the angle of the right half of the mandible." The external incision continued to drain until January of 1909, when the lower portion of the metal jaw was removed. Within two weeks the drainage stopped. She had no difficulty with her jaw until about eight years ago. At that time a lower

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