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Article
January 23, 1960

CLINICAL USE OF DEXAMETHASONEROLE IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ARTHRITIS

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Arthritis Section, Department of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1960;172(4):306-310. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020040004002
Abstract

The results of experience with cortisone and six other corticosteroids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been tabulated for comparison. The seven hormones all have potent ameliorating effects in that they permit increased function without greatly affecting the course of the disease. Some of the disagreeable systemic side-effects can be avoided by injecting the hormone into the inflamed joints, and few serious complications have been observed in more than 92,000 such injections in 3,000 patients. When side-effects occur, the hormone can be withdrawn provided this is done gradually over periods of at least several months. In 72 patients treated with dexamethasone increased appetite, weight gain, and mental stimulation were frequently encountered as side-effects. It is still not the ideal corticosteroid, but it is a useful addition to the list.

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