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Article
March 12, 1960

ROUTINE CARDIAC FLUOROSCOPY—AN UNNECESSARY HEALTH HAZARD

Author Affiliations

Beverly Hills, Calif.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, and Co-chief of the Cardiac Clinic, Cedars of Lebanon Hospital (Dr. Corday), and Professor of Radiology, University of Southern California, and Chief of the Department of Radiation Therapy, Cedars of Lebanon Hospital (Dr. Jaffe).

JAMA. 1960;172(11):1127-1130. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020110011003
Abstract

No amount of ionizing radiation, however small, should be considered inconsequential to the patient, to the physician and others engaged in radiologic work, or to their posterity. Young persons especially should be protected against needless exposure. Fluoroscopy involves considerable exposure. This can be reduced by a number of precautions here described. Fluoroscopy should not be allowed to become routine, and when it is necessary it should be preceded by a study of roentgenograms so that the fluoroscopist can concentrate his examination on specific areas and reduce the exposure.

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