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July 14, 1962

W. W. GERHARD, TYPHOID vs. TYPHUS FEVER

JAMA. 1962;181(2):154-155. doi:10.1001/jama.1962.03050280084012
Abstract

William Wood Gerhard (1809-1872), the most distinguished pupil of Louis, the great Parisian clinician of the 19th century, bested his teacher in the clear differentiation of typhus and typhoid fever. Previously, the diverse manifestations had been described and the afflicted treated as typhoid fever victims, without discrimination. Gerhard was born in Philadelphia, received his undergraduate training at nearby Dickinson College (founded by Benjamin Rush and others), and in 1830 obtained his doctorate in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. His graduation thesis, which discussed endermic medication, was published in the North American Medical and Surgical Journal.1 Devotion to the community, a characteristic of loyal Philadelphians, was interrupted by residence elsewhere on one occasion only. This was a two-year period of postgraduate study in Paris, the medical center of the world at that time. Although Chomel, Andral, Piorry, and others were judged to be excellent teachers in Paris and offered

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