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March 26, 1960

JEAN FERNEL (1485-1557)

JAMA. 1960;172(13):1394. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020130052016

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Rising at about 4 o'clock every morning he went from his bedroom down to his library. There he looked over some page of text of the ancient masters, either because he did not feel satisfied about it, or that he did not sufficiently remember it, or in order to add to it something by way of commentary. After that, with the coming of daylight, he went out to his public lectures, or to visit his patients. Then it was that urines were brought to him and he would inspect them. What he opined about them he made known, and ordered treatment according to the cause of the disease, and the constitution of the patient, as far as he could gather those by conjecture.

Back again for his meal, he retired to his library while dinner was being prepared, and when dinner was over retired thither again, until the time for

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