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Article
April 2, 1960

BUCKING AND BRONCHOSPASM AS PROBLEMS OF ANESTHESIA

Author Affiliations

Augusta, Ga.

From the Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Georgia, and the Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital.

JAMA. 1960;172(14):1499-1502. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020140035008
Abstract

Bucking and bronchospasm are two respiratory disorders that seriously upset the course of anesthesia. Bucking is a violent expiratory contraction of skeletal muscles; bronchospasm is a spastic contraction of the smooth musculature of the bronchial tree. Both are reflex responses to chemical or physical irritations such as accompany the insertion of an endotracheal tube and inhalation of concentrated vapors. Both can be avoided by due care in the administration of general anesthetics and by judicious use of local anesthesia before the insertion of the endotracheal tube. The spray tube here referred to facilitates the renewed application of local anesthetics to the mucosa of the trachea during the subsequent course of the anesthesia. While bronchospasm can be treated by other measures here described, prevention is by all means to be preferred.

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