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Article
April 2, 1960

TREATMENT OF DERMATOSES WITH INTRAVENOUSLY GIVEN METHYLPREDNISOLONE SODIUM SUCCINATE

Author Affiliations

Cincinnati

From the Department of Dermatology, University of Cincinnati Medical School.

JAMA. 1960;172(14):1514-1517. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020140050010
Abstract

Thirty-one different dermatoses were treated by intravenous administration of methylprednisolone sodium succinate to 242 patients. Despite the use of relatively large doses, none of the patients developed symptoms of adrenal atrophy or psychic depression. The usual dose per treatment was 20 mg., but some patients received 90 mg. daily for three weeks. Several patients with moon facies which developed during oral adrenal steroid therapy, previously prescribed, were relieved of this side-effect when the intravenous route of administration was used. When taken orally a percentage of this agent is thought to be converted to cortisone by the physiological activities of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This reaction is apparently obviated by intravenous or intramuscular administration, and the compound remains as methylprednisolone sodium succinate during its short life in vivo (half-life 188 minutes). Of the 242 patients treated only 18 had little or no improvement of their dermatoses.

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