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Article
May 7, 1960

POSTOPERATIVE ARTERIOVENOUS ANEURYSM IN MESENTERY AFTER SMALL BOWEL RESECTION

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Assistant Professor of Surgery at Chicago Medical School and Associate Attending Surgeon at Cook County Hospital (Dr. Movitz), and Senior Attending Surgeon at Norwegian-American Hospital (Dr. Finne).

JAMA. 1960;173(1):42-44. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.73020190005009b
Abstract

An abdominal exploration for an arteriovenous aneurysm in a 34-year-old woman revealed such a lesion to be present in the mesentery of the small intestine. This lesion apparently occurred after resection of the small bowel which was performed for intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions and associated with gangrenous bowel with mesenteric thrombosis. The arteriovenous aneurysm was situated in the healed mesenteric suture line near the base of the mesentery. Excision of this portion of mesentery was followed by uneventful recovery, with complete relief from abdominal pains and recurring mild diarrhea. A review of the literature on gross arteriovenous aneurysms reveals postoperative arteriovenous aneurysms to have occurred in the operative site after various operative procedures, as a direct result of the technical management of the contiguous artery and vein. These procedures have been reviewed, in their case reports, by Elkin and Banner1 and most recently by French and co-workers,2

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