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Article
June 11, 1960

HERNIA THROUGH FORAMEN OF WINSLOWREPORT OF A CASE AND DISCUSSION

Author Affiliations

Dublin, Ga.

JAMA. 1960;173(6):665-667. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.73020240005010c
Abstract

Hernia through the foramen of Winslow is one of the less common types of internal hernia. Hansmann and Morton1 found an incidence of 8% in 467 cases of internal hernia collected from the literature.2 Blandin first described hernia through the foramen of Winslow in 1834. Lavarde and Chevret,3 in 1949, reported less than 70 cases in the world literature.

The symptoms are usually upper abdominal pain followed by nausea and vomiting. Onset may follow the ingestion of a large meal. A history of previous episodes of upper abdominal pain has been obtained in some patients. Physical findings will vary with the degree of obstruction and the presence or absence of strangulated intestine. An epigastric mass and epigastric fullness have been described.

Roentgenographic evidence of hernia through the foramen of Winslow has been well described. A few instances have been recorded in which a roentgenographic diagnosis was made

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