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Article
July 23, 1960

DEVELOPING THE YOUNG PHYSICIAN'S RESPONSIBILITY AND JUDGMENT IN PATIENT CARE

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

From the Department of Surgery, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and University Hospitals of Cleveland.

JAMA. 1960;173(12):1312-1315. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020300024009
Abstract

In the past few years, considerable attention has been devoted to the process of educating the medical student. Endless discussions of this subject have occurred among the faculties of many medical schools, and a significant number of them have resulted in experiments in medical education that are being observed with great interest. Conferences, such as those sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges, have taken place with increasing frequency. Sporadic efforts are being made to accumulate, in a scientific fashion, data that will provide a more lucid comprehension of the many factors that influence beneficially or adversely the intellectual maturation of the medical student.

During this past decade of enlightened and praiseworthy experimentation in undergraduate medical education, efforts to study and improve the graduate education of the physician have been negligible. Occasional studies by individual departmental directors have been conducted but have not been publicized widely. It is apparent

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