[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 30, 1960

PROVIDING PHYSICIANS FOR THE UNITED STATES— THE QUANTITATIVE PROBLEM

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

Chief, Division of Public Health Methods, Public Health Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

JAMA. 1960;173(13):1435-1437. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03020310023008
Abstract

In December, 1958, the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service appointed a consultant group to study and report to him on the question of how the United States is to be supplied with an adequate number of well-qualified physicians. This group was a distinguished one and was well qualified for its job. Among its members were three medical school deans, five other college or university administrators, two regional education directors, six executives of professional associations, two representatives of business and industry, and three others whose interests and experience were in closely related fields. Its chairman was Mr. Frank Bane, former executive director of the Council of State Governments. The report was submitted to the Surgeon General in September, 1959.

The basic finding of the consultant group is that the United States faces a growing shortage of qualified physicians. My objective is first to give some of the evidence on

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×