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Article
November 5, 1960

CARCINOMA IN SITU AND INVASIVE CARCINOMA OF CERVIX UTERI

JAMA. 1960;174(10):1323-1324. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03030100091023
Abstract

Hertig and Gore, in Tumors of the Female Sex Organs,1 discuss the much debated question of the relationship of carcinoma in situ to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. In the statistics of Corscaden, quoted by Hertig and Gore, carcinoma of the cervix occurs at the rate of 34.3 cases per 100,000 female population in New York state, exclusive of New York City. Squamous cell carcinoma, constituting 90 to 95% of all cervical cancers, comprises 11% of all malignant neoplasms (irrespective of sex). Of female genital tract cancers, those of the cervix account for 55 to 65% of the total and are second only to breast cancer in their relative frequency in women. Squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix does not usually occur before the third decade and is most common in the fifth and sixth decades. It develops at the junction of the squamous and columnar

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