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Article
November 5, 1960

Oral Anatomy

JAMA. 1960;174(10):1352-1353. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03030100120042

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Abstract

In his introductory remarks the author strikes at the core of the major problem in dental and medical education—the correlation of basic scientific knowledge and clinical practice. In this third edition the ultimate success has been achieved, as far as can be in the written word, in making this correlation realistic. The author says, "This book tries to bridge the gap between theory and practice and to prove that anatomic understanding does not only facilitate clinical work but that it also allows for the substitution of a rigid clinical technique by an adaptable and therefore potentially progressive action."

The book is divided into two parts. The first is concerned primarily with the descriptive anatomy of the head and neck. It also includes a comprehensive discussion of head growth and tooth eruption which is essential to logical analysis and treatment of clinical conditions. This section has been expanded to include knowledge

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