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March 11, 1961

First Aid: Diagnosis and Management

JAMA. 1961;175(10):928-929. doi:10.1001/jama.1961.03040100092038

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It is not entirely clear, from the preface or after review, to whom this book is directed. I suspect that the authors regarded nonmedical people interested in first aid as their primary target. For the most part the book meets this purpose admirably. However, discussions such as those dealing with the management of wounds, the use of antibiotics, and indications and use of parenteral fluids are beyond the scope and needs of such persons, are suitable for medical students, but are probably too elementary for the intern or resident physician. The extent of the responsibilities of the first-aid worker are not defined as clearly as desired. For example, decision concerning the dubious use of topical antibiotics, the indications for benzine and gasoline in wound cleansing, and considerations relating to tetanus antitoxin should not be the responsibility of the nonmedical first-aid worker. Likewise, the definitive treatment of the dog and cat

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