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March 25, 1961

Growing Pains?

Author Affiliations

435 N. Roxbury Dr., Suite 302 Beverly Hills, Calif.

JAMA. 1961;175(12):1111. doi:10.1001/jama.1961.03040120073028

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  In The Journal of Nov. 19, 1960, p. 1656, under "Questions and Answers," the reply to a question concerning "nocturnal muscular pains" in children misses the most important factor. The enclosed table from my article (Differential Diagnosis of Rheumatic and Non-Rheumatic Leg Pains, Mod Conc Cardiov Dis24:296 [Oct.] 1955) indicates that these pains are very common and that they do not indicate organic disease. Such nocturnal pains occur in normal healthy children, may possibly be due to normal growth but more probably due to violent play during the previous day; massage and an aspirin tablet give almost immediate relief. The patient awakes completely relieved. Grandma may have been correct, there may be such a thing as "growing pains."

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