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May 20, 1961

Maximum Permissible Dose

Author Affiliations

U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory, San Francisco 24.

JAMA. 1961;176(7):635. doi:10.1001/jama.1961.03040200071022

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  The title of my contribution in The Journal, Jan. 21, p. 227, does not put the emphasis where I wish to have it put. Since your headline writer seems to have missed my point, I assume that I did not make the point clearly enough, and I am now apprehensive, lest those who read the essay also misunderstand it.I was talking about fear of injury to oneself by irradiation, not about the degree of hazard encountered in industry. I was trying to dispel the growing conviction of hazard in occupations in which film badges are used to eliminate hazards. I was trying to undo an evil that I am partly responsible for, as a member of the National Committee on Radiation Protection. The effect of radiation, diminishing as the exposure is made smaller, becomes unobservable for a certain range of exposures, but is presumed to continue

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