[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 23.23.47.118. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
August 5, 1961

INCREASING RECOGNITION OF THE SEVERITY OF CERTAIN TYPES OF HISTOPLASMOSIS

JAMA. 1961;177(5):325-326. doi:10.1001/jama.1961.03040310043009
Abstract

To the practitioner, histoplasmosis has been a late-comer to the diagnostic dilemma, and to many it still remains a puzzling one. Although fungi were the first etiologic agents of disease to be recognized (in favus in 1839), they had played almost no part in differential diagnosis, except for rare and always fatal exceptions, until 1937. Then the pioneer work of Gifford, Dixon, and Smith revealed that coccidioidomycosis was a common disease of the desert areas of California. It is now estimated that there are at least 10 million persons infected with this disease.

Histoplasmosis pursued a similar course, from 71 cases in 1945 to estimates of 30 million infected in 1950.1 The key to the detection of widespread infection was the skin test. Like tuberculin, it indicates infection past or present, rather than active disease. In each of these diseases, the skin test is an extremely specific and useful

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×