Other Articles
September 2, 1961

Associated Primary Endolaryngeal Carcinoma and Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Author Affiliations

Rochester, Minn.

From the Section of Surgery (Drs. Perez and Bernatz), the Section of Plastic Surgery (Dr. Devine), and the Section of Surgical Pathology (Dr. Woolner), Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation. Dr. Perez is a Fellow in Surgery.

JAMA. 1961;177(9):596-599. doi:10.1001/jama.1961.03040350006002

It is uncommon to find separate primary malignant tumors of the lung and larynx in the same patient. Eleven such cases are here reported. In 5 the diagnoses were synchronous; in 6 cases (metachronous) the pulmonary tumor was diagnosed more than 6 months after the laryngeal tumor. The presence or absence of the laryngeal carcinoma at the time when the pulmonary carcinoma was diagnosed did not significantly affect the patient's survival time after that date. Since it appears to be the pulmonary lesion that determines survival time, the authors recommend prompt bronchoscopy and examination of bronchial secretions in any laryngectomized patient with persistent hemoptysis.