[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.66.254. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 3, 1962

STOKES OF DUBLIN (1804-1878)

JAMA. 1962;182(5):568-569. doi:10.1001/jama.1962.03050440060020
Abstract

William Stokes was born into a family of political titans, intellectuals, and scientists. During the great moments of his medical career, he shared the leadership in Irish medicine with his associate, Robert James Graves, a physician of great clinical acumen, profound industry, and avowed humanitarianism. Other physicians who furthered the reputation of the Irish school of medicine in the 19th century, which began with John Cheyne, included Colles, Adams, Corrigan, Wallace, and Rynd. William's father, Whitley Stokes, professor of the practice of medicine in the Royal College of Physicians, was compelled to resign his Senior Fellowship because of alleged activity with the Society of United Irishmen, an organization whose objects of reform were gained by other than peaceful and constitutional means. Subsequently, his teaching position was restored, followed by the appointment as regius professor of medicine at Dublin University and physician to the Meath Hospital. He was a family man,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×