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Article
July 17, 1967

PETER LUDVIG PANUM (1820-1885) DANISH EPIDEMIOLOGIST AND PHYSIOLOGIST

JAMA. 1967;201(3):196-197. doi:10.1001/jama.1967.03130030066019
Abstract

P. L. Panum, who made notable observations on the contagion of measles before receiving his doctorate, was born the son of a military surgeon at Ronne on the island Bornholm, off the coast of Sweden.1 After the family moved to Rendsburg, Schleswig-Holstein, he began his university studies at the University of Kiel and later matriculated in medicine at the University of Copenhagen, qualifying for the degree in 1845. The following year his hospital training was interrupted when the government Medical Board, having observed his talents for investigation, sent the young physician as epidemiologist on a special mission to the Faeroe Islands to investigate a violent epidemic of measles. The report of this mission marked Panum not only as an outstanding inquirer into the customs and habits of a remote civilization, but especially as an inquirer into the contagious spread of measles.2 His next assignment was at the University

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