July 24, 1967

Some Comments on the Occasion of the 1967 Passano Award to Dr. Irvine Page

Author Affiliations

From the National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Washington, DC.

JAMA. 1967;201(4):255-256. doi:10.1001/jama.1967.03130040051013

It is a great pleasure for me to be with you and to have an opportunity to comment on the accomplishments and talents of Dr. Irvine Page, a distinguished scientist and physician.

You will not be surprised if I talk briefly on some aspects of hypertension and atherosclerosis. Our increasing understanding of these diseases and the scientific contributions of Dr. Page are intimately entwined and interdependent. But I will talk about the diseases in a very general way and only touch lightly upon Dr. Page's role in their exploration.

Three major points might be made: (1) These are important diseases. These and immediately related diseases continue to account for about half of all deaths in the United States. (2) Substantial progress has been made in clarifying both their nature and their management. (3) Finally, our considerations at this meeting can be viewed as a brief pause at a way station