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Article
August 28, 1967

MEDICAL NEWS

JAMA. 1967;201(9):27-38. doi:10.1001/jama.1967.03130090005003

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Abstract

Anginal Pain Without Atherosclerosis Found In 15% Of Patients Tested A significant number of patients with severe angina pectoris have what appears to be a cardiac abnormality that does not conform to any currently recognizable type of heart disease.

Anginal Pain Without Atherosclerosis Found In 15% Of Patients Tested Identification of such patients is important since the abnormality is apparently benign and the prognosis for the patient more encouraging than would be suggested by the severity of the anginal pain, Richard Gorlin, MD, told JAMAMedical News.

Anginal Pain Without Atherosclerosis Found In 15% Of Patients Tested Dr. Gorlin and his co-workers at the Cardiovascular unit of Boston's Peter Bent Brigham hospital have seen approximately 100 such patients; they comprise about 15% of the patients referred for coronary angiographic studies because of angina pectoris.

Anginal Pain Without Atherosclerosis Found In 15% Of Patients Tested These 100 patients all had normal coronary arteriograms.

Anginal Pain Without Atherosclerosis Found In 15% Of Patients Tested (The possibility of error in the coronary arteriogram is considered slight. In a test of the diagnostic accuracy of coronary angiography at the Peter Bent Brigham hospital,

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