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Article
October 16, 1967

Control of Accidents in Rural Areas

Author Affiliations

Berkeley, Calif

JAMA. 1967;202(3):244. doi:10.1001/jama.1967.03130160118033

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  During the interval between the first presentation of this topic at the National Conference on Rural Health in March 1966, and the recent publication in The Journal (201:176, 1967), substantial changes have occurred in a number of areas within the accident field. One of the more important of these was a decision by the Department of Labor concerning wages of ambulance personnel. This has almost doubled the cost of maintenance of ambulance services. The National Highway Safety Act of 1966 has led to establishment of federal standards requiring states to improve emergency medical services available to traffic victims. This is part of a broad program of accident control, which harmonizes with the establishment by the American Medical Association of a Committee on Emergency Medical Services.This committee has already held one major conference for the medical profession in April 1967, and plans a second much more

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