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Article
April 14, 1975

The Emergency Medical Service Systems Act of 1973

Author Affiliations

Stanford University Medical Center Stanford, Calif

JAMA. 1975;232(2):135. doi:10.1001/jama.1975.03250020013010

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Abstract

To the Editor.—  In reply to the article "The Emergency Medical Service Systems Act of 1973" (230:1139, 1974), I wish to make the following comments.Dr. Harvey's perception of the likely outcome that the passage of the Emergency Medical Systems Act will generate is highly idealistic. I do not believe that the passage of the act will result in proliferation of large numbers of emergency medicine residencies, nor that it will eliminate poorly trained physicians and other health personnel from the emergency medicine field. In addition, I doubt that a nationwide corps of ambulance emergency technicians will develop, nor do I think that the fact that the law forbids the withholding of emergency medical care services from any patient because of inability to pay will result in the poor getting adequate emergency medical care.It is at the moment almost impossible to ascertain exactly how much money authorized under Senator Cranston's

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