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Article
April 14, 1975

Retirement: "Second Wind"

JAMA. 1975;232(2):135-136. doi:10.1001/jama.1975.03250020013011
Abstract

To the Editor.—  The editorial on retirement, by Robert H. Moser, MD, (230:1311, 1974) is timely, factual, and brilliant. The position of the American Medical Association is clearly stated, namely that the nation's social policy should ensure that the older worker has the opportunity to continue productive employment as long as he wishes and is able to maintain a satisfactory level of efficiency.The AMA declaration is strongly supported by an amicus curiae brief of Bernard D. Hirsh, JD, General Counsel for the AMA. The case in point has to do with a challenge to the constitutionality of the Federal Employee Mandatory Requirement Law, 5 USC8335.Difficulties of retirement may be rooted in laxity or misconceptions at employment time—to become the forerunners of compromise, expediency, cost-saving measures, and hurried ambition. In a gloomy light, some believe that retirees live too long for their own good and posterity's—yet, conversely there is uncertainty

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