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Article
July 15, 1968

Early Experiences in the Treatment of Falciparum Malaria From Southeast Asia

Author Affiliations

USA; USAR; USAR
From the Department of Medicine, US Army Hospital, Camp Zama, Japan (MAJ Reed and CPT Steiger), and Preventive Medicine Branch, US Army Medical Command, Japan (CPT Feinstein).

JAMA. 1968;205(3):131-133. doi:10.1001/jama.1968.03140290023006
Abstract

Four hundred and twenty-six patients had 859 episodes of malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum in late 1965. An analysis of the results of therapy reveals the following data: chloroquine was successful as treatment in 11% of the cases, quinine in 50%, chloroquine and quinine in 35%, pyrimethamine in 91%, quinine and pyrimethamine in 95%, and all three drugs combined in 80% Quinine alone was more effective, when used for 13 days or longer, than when used for 12 days or less. Chloroquine had a dose-related inhibitory effect on the success rate when combined with quinine. The best combination used was quinine and pyrimethamine.

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