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Article
September 8, 1975

Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: A Sociological Study of the Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research

Author Affiliations

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh

 

by Bradford H. Gray, 298 pp, $13.50, New York, Wiley, 1975.

JAMA. 1975;233(10):1113. doi:10.1001/jama.1975.03260100083033

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Abstract

This book by Bradford Gray will be a landmark for the clinical researchers in academic medicine. He has documented objectively the problem in communication and the discrepancies between standards and practice in the conducting of clinical research. The book comes across as a scientific evaluation, done by an individual sympathetic to medicine and clinical investigation who finds glaring defects in the mechanisms now utilized for protecting the individual and his rights. The paternalism of the medical profession and conflict between ethics and the career interests of the investigators in the academic system are highlighted by the findings of the study.

There is no alternative but to admit we have done a poor job in actual performance despite meeting proper paper requirements. The author makes some definite recommendations for improving communication between investigator and subject and the monitoring, by the Clinical Research Committee, of the experimental process and the individual's rights.

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