[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.94.5. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 31, 1972

An Educational Model

Author Affiliations

Department of Neurology University of Cincinnati Medical Center Cincinnati

JAMA. 1972;219(5):608-609. doi:10.1001/jama.1972.03190310038011
Abstract

"We must educate people in what nobody knew yesterday, and prepare people in our schools for what no one knows yet, but what some people must know tomorrow," says Margaret Mead. This has been the goal of medical education for as long as I can remember. Having opted for a lifetime of learning and there being no question about his intelligence, the student of medicine is encouraged to take the initiative and practice what he hears and sees. Doing as well as studying under supervision, while no royal road to learning, is as good as has been devised to date. By broadening the sources of responsibility, all the while encouraging dissent, the student is afforded the moral advantage of becoming excellent in his own way. "... it is impossible you should take true root but by the fair weather that you make yourself: it is needful that you frame the season

×