[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.112.64. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 25, 1972

Tranquilizer Control

Author Affiliations

From the departments of community health (Dr. Kaufman), social service (Mr. Varner), and pharmacy (Mr. Mashburn), US Public Health Service Indian Hospital, Rapid City, SD; and the Department of Medicine (Dr. Brickner), St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center of New York.

JAMA. 1972;221(13):1504-1506. doi:10.1001/jama.1972.03200260040010
Abstract

A comprehensive program to reduce the distribution of tranquilizing drugs was established in a clinic serving an American Indian population of 6,000. Clinic staff, patients, and other community physicians were informed about the general problem of tranquilizer drug abuse. Individual counseling, written material, and mental health referrals were helpful in freeing patients from drug use. The program yielded a 52% decrease in tranquilizing pills dispensed from the clinic and a 33% decrease in the total number of prescriptions written for these drugs.

×