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Article
April 5, 1976

It Takes Four Years

Author Affiliations

Southern Nevada Memorial Hospital Las Vegas

JAMA. 1976;235(14):1424. doi:10.1001/jama.1976.03260400012006

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Abstract

To the Editor.—  In discussing the reasons for changing the medical school curriculum from three years to the customary four years at Rush Medical School, Dean Hejna stated: "The three-year curriculum serves to increase the number of graduates by only one class each 12 years" (234:387, 1975). This is a misunderstanding that I believe should be clarified. The operation of a three-year program vs a four-year program serves to increase the number of graduates by only one class at the third year. Thereafter, the number of graduates will be equal into infinity. For example, a class of 100 students entering a three-year medical school at the end of 100 years would produce 9,800 graduates; a class of 100 students entering a four-year medical school at the end of 100 years would produce 9,700 graduates. An advantage of 100 students in 100 years in favor of the three-year medical school. The

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