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Article
May 31, 1976

Integration of Handicapped Children in Society

Author Affiliations

Kennedy Memorial Hospital for Children Brighton, Mass

 

edited by James Loring and Graham Burn, 217 pp, with illus, $10.95, Boston, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1976.

JAMA. 1976;235(22):2435-2436. doi:10.1001/jama.1976.03260480053042

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Abstract

This is a series of 22 short pieces by 22 teachers, social workers, and others concerned with the subject, what to do with the congenitally deformed, the deaf, the blind, and myelodysplastic, the cerebral palsied—ie, the handicapped—child. Within the compass of British and Scandinavian school systems, the home base of the authors, planning of schooling and evaluation of results of regimens for those children can be very fruitful. And so they are. Applied to the United States scene, collecting data for this book would be nearly impossible. Where, in the United States, could one determine how many handicapped individuals go to college or what kinds of jobs actually are held by a significant group of deaf persons? Some of the answers are here, despite a somewhat superficial portrayal of some aspects of the subject and too many trite generalizations. The book reads very easily and would be an excellent introduction

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