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Article
October 11, 1976

Infection Control in Small HospitalsPrevalence Surveys in 18 Institutions

Author Affiliations

From the Infection Control Project, Intermountain Regional Medical Program (Drs Britt and Wilfert and Ms Nordquist); the Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Utah College of Medicine (Drs Britt, Burke, Wilfert, and Smith); and the LDS Hospital (Dr Burke), Salt Lake City.

JAMA. 1976;236(15):1700-1703. doi:10.1001/jama.1976.03270160022022
Abstract

In prevalence surveys of 18 small hospitals in the intermountain region, 20.4% of the patients had community-acquired infections and 7.2% had infections acquired in the hospital. The types of nosocomial infections and patterns of antibiotic usage were similar to those encountered in large hospitals. In the small hospitals, 49% of the suspected bacterial infections were cultured, whereas at a nearby large hospital 77% were cultured. Seventeen of these small hospitals had an infection-control committee but these committees were unable to assess adequately the extent of their nosocomial infection problems. Monitoring of the environment with bacterial cultures was a frequent practice; overall, a ratio of one environmental culture was performed to each three diagnostic cultures. These results indicate the need to develop and evaluate nosocomial infection control programs in small hospitals.

(JAMA 236:1700-1703, 1976)

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