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Article
October 8, 1973

Tularemia Epidemic Associated With the Deerfly

Author Affiliations

From the Utah State Division of Health, Salt Lake City, and the Epidemiology Program, Center for Disease Control, Public Health Service, Atlanta (Drs. Klock and Fukushima), and Eco-Dynamics, Inc., Salt Lake City (Dr. Olsen). Dr. Klock is now with the Pulmonary Disease Division, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.

JAMA. 1973;226(2):149-152. doi:10.1001/jama.1973.03230020019005
Abstract

During a three-month period in 1971, there were 39 persons in Utah who contracted tularemia. Twenty-eight of the 39 cases (72%) stemmed from bites of the deerfly (Chrysops discalis). Field surveys indicated the occurrence of a tularemia epizootic among rabbits during the epidemic period. Cultures were taken from animals and insects in epidemic areas and Francisella tularensis was isolated from both deerflies and rabbits. Although cultures of mosquitoes and gnats were negative, there was indirect evidence that one of these species may have transmitted tularemia to seven patients.

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