[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.175.236. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 14, 1974

Sleep Research and Clinical Practice

Author Affiliations

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Nashville, Tenn

 

edited by Gene Usdin, 94 pp, 6 illus, $6, Butterworths (Brunner/Mazel), 1973.

JAMA. 1974;227(2):209-210. doi:10.1001/jama.1974.03230150057039

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

This book contains three essays commissioned by the American College of Psychiatrists to introduce practicing psychiatrists to clinical sleep research. In the first essay Dement and Mitler define terminology and review recent studies of animal sleep. Williams and Karacan in the second chapter discuss a wide array of sleep-related symptoms and diseases including narcolepsy, cataplexy, nightmares, insomnia, snoring, sleepwalking, sleeptalking, depression, schizophrenia, hypothyroidism, uremia, asthma, and emphysema, as well as nocturnal seizures, tooth-grinding, angina, headache, dyspnea, and hemoglobinuria. Though each of these problems is only briefly considered, the broad scope of this essay written by psychiatrists for psychiatrists demonstrates how sleep research is helping to reintegrate psychiatry into general medicine. This chapter concludes with 220 references to the original literature.

In the final essay the Drs. Kales review their own experience with various sleep disorders with emphasis on insomnia. They find that most patients with chronic insomnia are depressed and

×