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Article
July 6, 1970

Fundamentals of Inhalation Therapy

Author Affiliations

Veterans Administration Hospital Cincinnati

 

by Donald F. Egan, 474 pp, 148 illus, $11, St. Louis: C. V. Mosby Co., 1969.

JAMA. 1970;213(1):132. doi:10.1001/jama.1970.03170270072032

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Abstract

The development and importance of inhalation therapy as a subspecialty of medicine during the past decade or so has been overshadowed by other advances in medicine, notably in the surgical sciences. Yet, unquestionably many of these other advances have been made possible or enhanced by proper pulmonary evaluation, preparation, and treatment of the patient.

The science of inhalation therapy as we know it today revolves about five factors: appreciation of the underlying pathologic physiology which dictates the need for this mode of treatment; understanding of pertinent chemical and physical principles; precise evaluation of pulmonary function of candidates for therapy; perfection of equipment for administering therapy; and widespread establishment of inhalation therapy schools and departments. A book or manual has been sorely needed which encompasses a consideration of all of these factors. Egan's book more than adequately meets that need.

The author begins by considering the physics and chemistry of pertinent

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