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Article
January 23, 1978

Gonococcal Perihepatitis in a Female Adolescent Fitz-Hugh—Curtis Syndrome

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center (Drs McLain, Mehta, and London); and Rush Medical College (Mr Decker and Mr Nye); Chicago.

JAMA. 1978;239(4):339-340. doi:10.1001/jama.1978.03280310071025
Abstract

THERE have been many case reports of gonococcal perihepatitis (Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome).1 Almost all of the patients described in these reports were young adult women, although the entity has been described in male subjects.2 We have recently seen this syndrome in a 15-year-old girl.

Report of a Case  A 15-year-old girl was admitted with a chief complaint of persistent abdominal pain for the past two weeks. She was apparently well until two weeks prior to admission, when she began to have abdominal pain located in the right upper quadrant. The pain was sharp and constant. There was no history of nausea, vomiting, anorexia, or fever. The pain had no relation to the ingestion of food. The menstrual history revealed regular menstruation every 30 days, lasting four to five days, with moderate flow and no dysmenorrhea. Her last menstrual period was one week prior to admission. The patient admitted to

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