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Article
January 2, 1987

Voluntary Self-Exclusion to Reduce Transmission of AIDS by Blood Transfusion-Reply

Author Affiliations

Upper Savannah Health District Greenwood, SC
Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health Baltimore

Upper Savannah Health District Greenwood, SC
Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health Baltimore

JAMA. 1987;257(1):29. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390010032019

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Abstract

In Reply.—  We fully agree with Kalish and coworkers that it is "imperative to use all possible methods to remove high-risk donors from the population prior to testing." We did not, in any way, intend to denigrate the importance of voluntary self-exclusion in assuring a safe blood supply, and our conclusion, as stated at the end of our letter to the editor, was that "requests for voluntary self-exclusion, alone, were not sufficient to ensure a safe blood supply." The important word in that conclusion is, of course, "alone." We fully agree with Kalish and colleagues that self-exclusion is an integral part of ensuring a safe blood supply and must be continued.Kalish et al also point out that our study did not "address the issue of voluntary self-deferral by asymptomatic high-risk donors." Our study, by its nature, required that we review the blood donation records only of individuals who were

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