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Article
January 9, 1987

Asymptomatic Opacity of the Left Hemithorax in an Adult

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Medicine (Drs La Delfa and Hoffstein) and Anesthesia (Dr McLean), St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto.

From the Departments of Medicine (Drs La Delfa and Hoffstein) and Anesthesia (Dr McLean), St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto.

JAMA. 1987;257(2):225-226. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390020091033
Abstract

History  A 30-year-old man was admitted for removal of a Silastic rod inserted four months earlier after a traumatic laceration of the flexor tendon of his left fifth finger. Otherwise he was asymptomatic and specifically denied any symptoms referrable to the chest (and heart). He was a nonsmoker and had a normal history of development in childhood. Physical examination revealed a healthy man in no distress with no fever, cyanosis, clubbing, or lymphadenopathy. The trachea was shifted to the left. The left hemithorax was dull to percussion. Expansion of the chest and vocal and tactile fremitus were reduced over the left hemithorax, and breath sounds also were decreased on the left side. The results of the remainder of the physical examination were completely normal. Findings from his admission laboratory tests, electrocardiogram, and analysis of blood gases were all normal. Posteroanterior and lateral roentgenograms of the chest were obtained (Fig 1,

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