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Article
February 27, 1987

Bronchodilating Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate in Bronchial Asthma

Author Affiliations

From the First Department of Internal Medicine, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

From the First Department of Internal Medicine, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

JAMA. 1987;257(8):1076-1078. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390080066032
Abstract

The bronchodilating effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) was studied in ten asthmatic patients with mild attacks. In five patients, 0.5 mmol/min of MgSO4 was administered intravenously for 20 minutes, and the time courses of respiratory resistance, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume at 1 s were studied. In another five patients, MgSO4 dose-response curves were obtained. Soon after administration began, MgSO4 relieved bronchoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum responses (mean ± SE) of respiratory resistance, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume were 71% ±3%, 117% ±5%, and 118%±1% of initial values, respectively, and were similar to the effects of additional albuterol inhalation. The infusion of MgSO4 also improved dyspnea and piping rales in three other asthmatic patients with a severe attack. We conclude that intravenous infusion of MgSO4 produces a rapid and marked bronchodilation in both mild and severe asthma and may be a unique bronchodilating agent.

(JAMA 1987;257:1076-1078)

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