[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 27, 1987

Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus by Artificial Insemination

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Denver Veterans Administration Medical Center (Drs Berry and Vierling); the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Rose Medical Center, Denver (Dr Gottesfeld); and the Immunology Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md (Dr Alter).

From the Departments of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Denver Veterans Administration Medical Center (Drs Berry and Vierling); the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Rose Medical Center, Denver (Dr Gottesfeld); and the Immunology Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md (Dr Alter).

JAMA. 1987;257(8):1079-1081. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390080069033
Abstract

Although the capacity for transmission of hepatitis B infection by semen is well recognized, the potential for transmission by artificial insemination remains theoretical. Currently, screening of semen donors for hepatitis B virus infection is not standard practice. We saw a case of acute viral hepatitis B in a woman following artificial insemination with semen from a donor subsequently found to be positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Both the donor serum and semen contained HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen, and the HBsAg subtype was identical to that of the patient. Documentation of hepatitis B virus transmission by artificial insemination indicates that HBsAg screening of semen donors should be routine practice.

(JAMA 1987;257:1079-1081)

×