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Article
February 27, 1987

Toxic Shock Syndrome During an Influenza Outbreak

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Roanoke (Va) Memorial Hospital, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville. Dr Sperber is now with the Division of Epidemiology and Virology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville.

From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Roanoke (Va) Memorial Hospital, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville. Dr Sperber is now with the Division of Epidemiology and Virology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville.

JAMA. 1987;257(8):1086-1087. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390080076036
Abstract

TOXIC shock syndrome is a potentially fatal multisystem illness associated with Staphylococcus aureus infection and production of toxins. Although this syndrome usually occurs in menstruating women, we saw a case of fatal toxic shock syndrome in a young man who developed S aureus pneumonia during an influenza outbreak.

Report of a Case  A previously healthy 18-year-old male college student presented to a local hospital during an influenza outbreak with three days of fever, sore throat, myalgias, and diarrhea and one day of productive cough and dyspnea. His blood pressure was 80/60 mm Hg and his temperature was 39.4°C. He was admitted. Congested lung fields were noted. The leukocyte count was 3700/mm3 (3.7×109/L), with 18% (0.18) polymorphonuclear cells, 65% (0.65) band forms, 3% (0.3) lymphocytes, 1% (0.1) mononuclear cells, and 13% (0.13) metamyelocytes. The platelet count was 104000/mm3 (104×109/L) and the prothrombin and partial thromboplastin

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