[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.191.72. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 13, 1987

Recovery of Human Immunodeficiency Virus From Serum

Author Affiliations

Cancer Research Institute University of Caligornia School of Medicine San Francisco

Cancer Research Institute University of Caligornia School of Medicine San Francisco

JAMA. 1987;257(10):1327. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390100065011
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Our laboratory has reported the isolation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PMCs) from over 300 individuals with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related conditions and from asymptomatic individuals from the risk groups.1,2 We have also isolated the AIDS virus from a variety of body fluids, including serum, plasma, tears, urine, saliva, and genital secretions.3,4 We now report the results of a survey of serum samples from 78 randomly selected, seropositive individuals, of whom about 30% were asymptomatic. Infectious virus was recovered from the serum of 20 (25.6%) of these individuals and was generally present in low titers. Only undiluted serum (not a tenfold dilution) yielded infectious virus as detected by assays on uninfected PMCs.2 In one serum sample, 25000 infectious particles per milliliter were detected as measured by end dilution of the serum. This sample came from

×