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Article
March 13, 1987

Treatment of Patients With Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and Associated Manifestations

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, and University of California, San Francisco.

From the Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, and University of California, San Francisco.

JAMA. 1987;257(10):1367-1374. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390100105034
Abstract

PATIENTS with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) suffer from a variety of opportunistic infections and malignancies. There is, as of yet, no known cure for this disease.

Early in the course of the AIDS epidemic, therapy was directed only toward the management of manifestations of the disease (opportunistic infections and malignancies). As the immunologic abnormalities associated with AIDS became more clearly defined and with the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), treatment of the underlying immunodeficiency disorder with immunomodulators or antiviral agents became a possibility. This review will focus both on treatment of the disease manifestations and on more recent investigations into the use of immunomodulators and antiviral agents. The role of supportive care, which is important in the treatment of patients with this disease, has been discussed elsewhere.1

TREATMENT OF CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF AIDS 

Opportunistic Infections  The therapeutic approach to AIDS patients with

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