[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.187.2. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 27, 1987

The Use of Literary Classics in Teaching Medical Ethics to Physicians

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Evanston Hospital, Evanston, III (Drs Radwany and Adelson); and the Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago (Dr Adelson). Dr Radwany is now with the Department of Medicine, Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio.

From the Department of Medicine, Evanston Hospital, Evanston, III (Drs Radwany and Adelson); and the Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago (Dr Adelson). Dr Radwany is now with the Department of Medicine, Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio.

JAMA. 1987;257(12):1629-1631. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390120091030
Abstract

ETHICS is the division of philosophy that deals with questions of right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions and inactions. Medical ethics comprises those ethical issues pertaining to health care. There is widespread agreement that the discussion of ethical issues arising from the practice of medicine ought to be an integral part of the education of every physician.2 Such discussions have been shown to leave physicians feeling better prepared to address the bewildering array of ethical issues and moral dilemmas encountered daily in their clinical practice.3 Yet few agree on the means to this end.

Some educators prefer to emphasize the humanities in premedical education.4 Others advocate an integrated medical school curriculum, with didactic instruction in medical ethics during the preclinical years, enhanced by patient-centered ethical discussions during the final two years.5,6 Such an approach would parallel the progression from science to

×