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Article
February 16, 1994

Rochalimaea InfectionsAre They Zoonoses?

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Medicine (Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine) and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford (Calif) University Medical Center.

JAMA. 1994;271(7):553-554. doi:10.1001/jama.1994.03510310083044
Abstract

Rochalimaea are gram-negative bacteria that are recently discovered agents of new clinical syndromes, including bacillary angiomatosis (BA) and bacillary peliosis hepatis, and two well-known diseases, cat scratch disease (CSD) and trench fever. Trench fever, first described as an epidemic infection in World War I, was attributed to louse-borne Rochalimaea quintana infections, which were thought to be quite rare in the United States. Rochalimaea henselae is a newly described member of the genus,1 very closely related to R quintana, and was first shown to be a causative agent of BA,2 peliosis hepatis,3,4 and a febrile bacteremia syndrome5 in 1990. Recent studies have also demonstrated that R quintana infection can also produce BA in patients who have tested positive for the human immunodeficiency virus.6Rochalimaea henselae may also cause a syndrome resembling trench fever in immunocompetent individuals exposed to tick bites,7 and a few patients without

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