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Article
April 10, 1987

Asymptomatic Ischemia in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

Author Affiliations

From the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

From the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

JAMA. 1987;257(14):1923-1928. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390140093034
Abstract

ANGINA pectoris is the hallmark symptom of coronary artery disease and its frequency and severity has traditionally provided the basis for evaluation and treatment.

Assessment of patients with coronary artery disease and decisions regarding their treatment are usually based on the patient's subjective account of symptoms. Studies (exercise tolerance tests, radionuclide angiography, and coronary arteriography) performed during brief visits to the clinic or hospital can only provide an indirect estimate of the patient's ischemic activity out of the hospital. Recent studies suggest that a large population of adults with coronary artery disease experience many episodes of asymptomatic or silent transient myocardial ischemia on a daily basis, apart from the events that occur with pain.1,2 Ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring of ST segments provides an objective measurement of transient ischemia during everyday life, and, as a result, a more extensive and detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease has

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