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Article
August 7, 1987

Medicine, Radiation, and Probability of Causation

Author Affiliations

National Institutes of Health Ad Hoc Working Group to Develop Radioepidemiological Tables Bethesda, Md

National Institutes of Health Ad Hoc Working Group to Develop Radioepidemiological Tables Bethesda, Md

JAMA. 1987;258(5):609-610. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400050051013
Abstract

To the Editor.—  The Council on Scientific Affairs, in its article entitled "Radioepidemiological Tables,"1 recommended that "the probability of causation approach not be applied to occupational radiation exposures or to diagnostic or therapeutic exposures in medicine."Public Law 97-414, which mandated preparation of the Radioepidemiological Tables, is very specific in that it requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services only to "devise and publish radioepidemiological tables that estimate the likelihood that persons who have or have had any of the radiation-related cancers and who have received specific doses prior to the onset of such disease developed cancer as a result of these doses." This law does not state how these tables should be used in lawsuits that might be brought to compensate individuals who claim they are victims of radiation-related induction of cancer. According to the law, the Secretary of Health and Human Services cannot specifically exempt persons

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